• August 9, 2019 /  Basics, Miscelleaneous

    Elder Care Management logo

    By Ginger McMurchie, Elder Care Management of Northern California Owner & Care Manager

    In this edition of our newsletter, we would like to introduce the idea of transitions. For the next few months we will focus on three topics-

    When should a family bring in outside help to the home?

    When do you know it is time to move to assisted living?

    When should a person consider hospice?

    Our first topic is likely the easiest to navigate. The home where you or your loved one lives is getting too big for one person to handle. Tasks take longer to accomplish; they take more energy and sometimes things get left undone. Driving is complicated by poor vision, difficulty getting in and out of the car and demands too much brainpower- it is no longer the independent pleasure it used to be. The simple task of bathing now seems overwhelming and gets put off until another day and putting on clean clothes seems unnecessary or goes unnoticed. Your doctor, family, and sometimes friends are telling you that you need more help around the house. So, what are the options?

    If the house is all you need help with, that is a simple fix. A housekeeper once or twice a month can keep bathrooms clean, the kitchen scrubbed and can get the vacuuming and dusting taken care of. Tired of gardening? Hiring a gardener or young adult from the neighborhood to mow the lawn and rake the debris keeps the yard tidy. If you need assistance with personal care, then it may be time to consider a caregiver. As care managers, we always encourage people to use licensed home care agencies for help. A licensed agency will act as the employer, pay the payroll taxes and will screen the caregivers by doing background checks. These caregivers should come to you with ample training on personal care and with some coaching from you might be able to make your favorite mac and cheese. While it may sound simple, having a stranger in your home is not easy. It takes time and patience to establish a relationship with a caregiver and home care agency. If the caregiver does not feel like a good fit- ask for someone else!

    We want to acknowledge that all the above ideas come at a price. Caregivers across the state average anywhere from $26-33 per hour with the agency typically asking for a four-hour minimum. Housecleaners may cost an additional $100-200 per month. For those on a fixed income, applying for Medi-Cal, getting on IHSS or if you are a veteran or spouse of a veteran looking into the Veterans Aid and Attendance Program may be good ideas. We encourage you to start a conversation with loved ones about how things are going around the house. Ask your friends and family for recommendations on housecleaners and gardeners. Research and meet staff from local home care agencies. Keep everyone’s phone number handy because the day will come when we all need additional help!

    At Elder Care Management of Northern California we partner with families, elders, community members, and employers to tackle the tough issues of elder care.  Please visit our website at www.ecmnca.com or call to get more information about our services.

    Posted by Michael Storz @ 6:00 am

    Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *